MY WRITING PROCESS – INSIDE A WRITER’S MIND

 

The NIWA Spring Blog Tour may be over, but the advice just keeps on coming. Since there were six bloggers writing six posts each, there are still 30 posts to go. These were originally posted on other bloggers’ sites, but I’m going to run them here as well. Stay tuned for more NIWA tour posts throughout the summer.

I’m beginning with my own posts that appeared elsewhere. But first, a little about NIWA:

The Northwest Independent Writers’ Association serves Pacific Northwest writers working to achieve professional standards in independent writing, publishing and marketing. NIWA is open to all published and unpublished writers in the Pacific Northwest Area and represents all genres in both fiction and nonfiction. Click here for more information. We would love to have you join.

Benefits of membership:

  • Monthly Membership Newsletter – with information about what’s happening in NIWA as well as upcoming events.

  • Free author’s page and advertising of your books in our online Catalog pages.

  • Access to the Members Only section of our webpage featuring an Author Resource Guide, Events & Con Listings, plus forms for being featured on our website, plus easy membership renewal. 

  • Opportunity to submit a short story for the annual NIWA Anthology.

  • and more!

 

MY WRITING PROCESS – INSIDE A WRITER’S MIND

I was born to write. I love being alone. I love being quiet. I absolutely adore running around inside my head. The only time I’m really at peace is when I’m writing.

This realization didn’t come about easily. In a society that rewards extraversion, I spent years hiding my desire to be left alone. Then one night I sat down at the computer and began to write a story. Forty pages later, I knew I had found something important to my life.

That first forty pages turned into 450, a mystery called “The Oldest House.” I loved the way the story revealed itself to me, taking its own twists and turns. I loved the freedom I felt when I was writing it. When finished, I enthusiastically sent it to publishers and agents and got my first round of rejection slips. That didn’t stop me from writing, just from sending queries. I soon settled into my second mystery, “Broken Roses.”

Noted sci-fi author David Gerrold said in his Worlds of Wonder workshop that the first million words are practice. That sounds like a lot, but if you truly love to write, they just happen. By the time I found myself penning my first Crazy Cat Lady cozy mystery, I had hit that million mark. And I’d learned so much along the way.

I am now working on my 7th and 8th Crazy Cat Lady mystery, and I have the process down. Here’s how it goes:

  1. The initial idea.

The first glimmer of a thought that could be a story that could be a book comes in many forms. It can be a writer’s prompt or something you see at the store. It can be a dream. I often think of a title and work from there. Cat Café was such a story. I loved the idea of cat cafés, and took off from there.

  1. The thrill of the first draft.

Once I’ve got my idea, it’s time to run with it. I try not to think too much as I pen that initial draft; just let the story lead me. I don’t fuss over grammar or wording—that can be fixed later. If I require research, I make a note to come back. This is the fun stuff, riding on the wings of pure creativity.

  1. The work begins: the second and third (and possibly fourth) draft.

Now for the real work, editing and revision. During these run-throughs, I check for flow and continuity, for gaps and discrepancies, for plot holes, and for anything that doesn’t seem right to me. I use an ongoing outline, a cast of characters list, and a note page where I write whatever comes to mind. Yes, I do use color-coding.

  1. The print-out/read-through. (Red pen required)

After all those edits, the manuscript should be perfect, right? Unfortunately it usually isn’t. This is when I print it out and read it out loud to my cats. Seeing the words on paper reveals typos and overused words. Reading out loud shows the flow of the wording. This is especially importing with conversations. Ask yourself, do people really talk like that, or am I channeling Agatha Christie?

  1. The beta readers.

Now that I’ve fixed the problems I found in the read-through, it’s time to hand off the red pen to someone else. As the writer, I instinctively fill in gaps that would be glaringly obvious to others, but another reader will catch those things and more. I have a list of questions for the beta reader to answer once she’s finished reading, such as, “When did you realize who the killer was?” and the ever-revealing, “Did you like it?” (Please, please say yes!)

  1. The editor.

I love my editor. She’s smart, savvy, and knows where to put the commas. Once the manuscript is as perfect as I can hope for it to be, I say goodbye to it for a little while to let her do her magic. It takes time as we go back and forth with questions and comments. Then, voila, it comes back to me a fully formatted book!

  1. Revising with the proof copy.

I publish through Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing because it’s easy and free. I begin with the print version which allows me to order a proof copy. Once the proof is in my hand, it’s red pen time again. In the same way the print-out revealed mistakes, reading the actual book shows up lingering issues. I know we were taught not to write in books, but get over it and use that red pen!

  1. Finishing touches.

There are things a writer must do that go along with publishing, such as cover design, back cover blurb, front and back matter, bio, and links. Blurbs are hard for me, so I often begin working on them long before the book is finished. For Cat Café, I wrote one of my most well-received mini-blurbs though I still had no idea where the story was going: “A body is found in the cat café, and all the black cats are missing.”

  1. Do it all over again!

Congratulations! The book is done and out! Celebrate, then it’s time to get on with the next book.

This post was originally posted on Peak Amygdala, Joyce Reynolds-Ward’s blogsite.

 

About Mollie Hunt

I am the crazy cat lady, animal shelter volunteer, Trekkie, and mystery writer. I live in the rainy Pacific Northwest and will watch any TV show or movie filmed here. Even though I am of a goodly age (sixty-something) I go to Star Trek conventions in costume and am not afraid to be by myself. I enjoy my life in the cat lane. Words to live by: Spay and neuter; Live long and prosper; Grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can and the wisdom to know the difference.
This entry was posted in Book Talk, Crazy Cat Lady Mysteries & More, Self-Publishing, Writing and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to MY WRITING PROCESS – INSIDE A WRITER’S MIND

  1. Brian says:

    Thanks for sharing your process, it’s got to be such a nice feeling of accomplishment when you get the finished product.

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