THE FLIGHT OF FARAWAY NIGHT

 

Faraway Night rises up from the ponderous earth into the singing stars and flies. Beneath her cat-wings, the world is going through metamorphosis. Cities unfurl into hills and dells. Their electric chaos winks out like candle flames. A steeple from a vintage Christmas card appears before her. She alights upon the bell tower with a thump.

As the kitten gazes out over the cobblestone roads and lamp-lit window of the village, she feels peace, a peace she had never found in the places she knew.

But in the street below she spies a shape, dark as oil, slinking through the shadows. Perhaps the serenity is not what it seems.

Catch up with the Faraway Night Saga.

Part 1: The Journey Of Faraway Night

Part 2: The Wonder of Faraway Night

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About Mollie Hunt

I am the crazy cat lady, animal shelter volunteer, Trekkie, and mystery writer. I live in the rainy Pacific Northwest and will watch any TV show or movie filmed here. Even though I am of a goodly age (sixty-something) I go to Star Trek conventions in costume and am not afraid to be by myself. I enjoy my life in the cat lane. Words to live by: Spay and neuter; Live long and prosper; Grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can and the wisdom to know the difference.
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3 Responses to THE FLIGHT OF FARAWAY NIGHT

  1. Jake says:

    I really like how densely you pack your prose. Makes me have to read it twice.

    And it’s better the second time.

    • Mollie Hunt says:

      Thank you. It’s so opposite to writing books, but the character, Faraway Night, is huge in my imagination.

      • Jake says:

        It’s a fun challenge, for sure. It’s definitely one of the biggest draws bof flash fiction–at least it is for me.

        And it’s begun to leak into my long form fiction, too. It’s fun to set up a scene for 5,000 words only to deconstruct it in two tightly-woven sentences. It’s fun to play with bathos like that: even if the resolution isn’t necessarily anticlimactic, the explanation is.

        Anywho, really dig your work. I’ll be back for more.

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